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Vestibular Adaptations Induced by Gentle Physical Activity Are Reduced Among Older Women

Abstract : The aim of this study was to compare the ability of older individuals to maintain an efficient upright stance in contexts of vestibular sensory manipulation, according to their physical activity status. Two groups of healthy older women (aged over 65) free from any disorders (i.e., neurological, motor and metabolic disorders) and vestibular disturbances, participated in this study. One group comprised participants who regularly practiced gentle physical activities, i.e., soft gym, aquarobic, active walking, ballroom dancing (active group, age: 73.4 (5.8) years, n = 17), and one group comprised participants who did not practice physical activities (non-active group, age: 73.7 (8.1) years, n = 17). The postural control of the two groups was compared in a bipedal reference condition with their eyes open and two vestibular sensory manipulation conditions (i.e., bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) at 3 mA, in accordance with two designs). The main results indicate that there was no difference between the active and the non-active groups in all the conditions. It is likely that the aging process and the type of physical practice had limited the ability of the active group to counteract the effects of vestibular sensory manipulation on postural control more efficiently than the non-active group.
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Submitted on : Tuesday, December 11, 2018 - 10:07:04 AM
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Julien Maitre, Thierry Paillard. Vestibular Adaptations Induced by Gentle Physical Activity Are Reduced Among Older Women. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Frontiers, 2017, 9, ⟨10.3389/fnagi.2017.00167⟩. ⟨hal-01950854⟩

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